2019 CSA Share ~ Week #14

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

We are beginning to reserve our Late Season shares…..if you are enjoying the season so far and would like to continue on until the week before Thanksgiving, just get in touch and we’ll add  you to the Late Season membership! With the exception of Portland deliveries, all Late Season deliveries will be on Friday’s beginning October 24th, after the Standard Season ends. Portland deliveries will be on the weekends, at our Saturday PSU and Hollywood Farmers Markets, and on Sunday at our King Farmers Market.

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Cauliflower
  • Carrots
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumber
  • Onions
  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Lettuce
  • Corn
  • Cilantro

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Broccoli
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Eggplant

RECIPES:

Thai Spicy Eggplant w/Basil

Cauliflower Bread w/Garlic & Herbs

Cauliflower Bolognese

Baked Tomatoes

Roasted Red Peppers & Cherry Tomatoes w/Ricotta

Magic Pickled Carrots

Oh come on!!! This much rain…..this early….it can’t be really happening! I don’t know about you, but I’m not prepared, and neither is the farm! We are scurrying to get the rest of the onions out of the field, and let’s not even talk about the tomatoes! One thing we do know as farmers is that Mother Nature will have her way with us and there isn’t much we can do about it, except try and be prepared for any eventuality. As farmers we learn to take life one day at a time, adjusting our perspective and tasks accordingly. So we don our rain gear and boots and tromp on out to soggy fields to do our best with what the day and the weather present us with. Hopefully sunny outlooks will help to bring sunny weather back into our realm, and dry us out for a bit longer….not ready for Fall yet!

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Adelaide lifting a bin of onions almost as big as herself!

Your boxes are lovely today, full of the waning variety of summer crops. Enough corn to host a little dinner party, unless you’re a corn hound, and then maybe just enough for you! It’s so sweet and delicious this year. The crew did their best to weed out any split cherry tomatoes but you might find one or two in your pint. Tomatoes do not like the rain and cool temps and tend to begin splitting after a few days of exposure.

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Hayley getting her workout lifting the boxes this week…they’re heavy!

I want to remind you that the That’s My Farmer fundraising dinner is coming up the end of September. If you’ve attended before, you already know what a fantastic event this is, and how delicious the menu is. If you haven’t attended before, you might want to give it a try this year! Not only is it a wonderful fundraiser to raise funds for the Low Income Fund that the participating farmers use to help families in need receive healthy, organic produce, but it’s an awesome way to eat locally grown food, prepared by some of the best chef’s in town. Tiffany and Mark of Party Downtown always go way beyond in creating a fabulous menu with the meat and veggies donated by the farmers, and we have a lot of fun as well. The event is Monday, September 30th at 6pm at the Party Downtown location on 8th Ave. If you wold like to reserve a seat you can send your reservation to Winter Green Farm or call the farm office at 541-935-1920.

We hope that you have a wonderful week ahead and enjoy your CSA Share this week!

Linda and all of your Winter Green Farmers

 

 

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #13

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“I think preparing food and feeding people brings nourishment not only to our bodies but to our spirits. Feeding people is a way of loving them, in the same way that feeding ourselves is a way of honoring our own createdness and fragility.”
Shauna Niequist, Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace, and Learning the Hard Way

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Tomatoes! We have a surplus of tomatoes right now, so if you would like to order a flat, just let us know. We are offering 15# flats for $34.

Beef or Lamb Shares! We have sold out of our hamburger only Beef shares, but we have plenty of the mixed cuts to offer. If you would like to have the info for either the Beef or the Lamb, call/email the office at 541-935-1920 or folks@wintergreenfarm.com

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Corn
  • Carrots
  • Lettuce ~ Curly Romaine
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Cauliflower
  • Eggplant
  • Peppers
  • Tomatoes
  • Onions
  • Cherry Tomatoes

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Beets
  • Broccoli

RECIPES:

Chilled Coconut Corn Soup

Fresh Corn Carbonara

Spicy Eggplant & Cauliflower w/Basil

Cauliflower Cake

Herb Crusted Cauliflower Steaks w/Beans & Tomatoes

Roasted Eggplant w/Miso & Sesame Seeds

September! As I sit writing this today, I am enjoying the beautiful view outside my window. The sun is shining, the sky is the bluest, and I’m in full denial that Fall is just weeks away. Yes, the leaves are changing, and falling, the temps are dropping at night, and the sun is rising later, and setting earlier, kids going back to school. Still….denial to the bitter end. I love the warm summer months so much, planting, harvesting, watching things grow. I know there is a time to every season, and welcome them all joyously, but summer is my favorite, and I’m always a bit sad to watch it fading….

We have Corn!! So happy to be putting the first ears in your boxes this week, and there will be more to come. There is something so mystical and magical about corn and it’s been revered in so many cultures since the beginning of agriculture.

IMG_3565Botanically known as Zea mays, all varieties of corn are grass, belonging to the gramineae family, along with wheat, oats, and rye. Corn, often referred to as maize, is one of the ancient staples. The grain is believed to have been domesticated from teosinte, a wild grass that grew in central America. Dried fossil cores, drilled from below Mexico City, have been found to contain corn pollen grains determined to be over 80,000 years old! The original corn was different than the corn of today, as Mesoamerican tribes improved the grain by systematically selecting desired traits.

The name corn evolved from Indo-European words. The Germans used the word “korn”, meaning cereal grain, and the Latin term “granum” meant edible grass. The word “maize” was from the Taino people, who populated the Northern Antilles. It was transmutated from their word “Mahis”, which meant “Source of Life”. They inhabited the island of San Salvador, where it is believed Christopher Columbus first landed. They gave him the corn to take home to Spain. Corn was so important to the Pueblo tribes of the Southwest that it was considered one of the Three Sacred Sisters, along with squash and beans. Native American cultures are rich with stories involving corn. The early settlers would not have survived had it not been for the introduction of corn to them by the native peoples. It became so important, they used it not only for food, but for their currency and trade.

The corn crop dominates American agriculture, doubling any other crop. Seventy to eighty million US acres are planted annually, with over a $30 million value. This humble kernel finds its way into your life in many different ways, as edible and inedible products. Besides the wonderful, sweet summer vegetable that we all love, corn is made into rubber, plastic that degrades, a fuel called ethanol, clothing (rayon), paper, and so much more. It is one of our chief exports, and a major livestock feed source.

Even though much of the nutrition has been sacrificed through the years in search of sweetness, corn still offers a significant amount of Vitamins A, B-complex, phosphorous, and potassium, along with vegetable protein. Corn, combined with most beans or a dairy source, forms a complete protein, and is an excellent source of complex carbohydrates. What would a summer BBQ be without a few ears of steaming, buttered corn!

Fun Corn Facts:

  • Corn is a type of grass and the number of rows on a kernel is almost always an even number. The average ear of corn has sixteen rows and a total of 800 kernels.
  • Corn is actually the flower of the plant. Corn silk must be pollinated in order for corn kernels to grow. There is one silk strand for each kernel on the cob.
  • Seventy-five percent of all items found in grocery stores contain corn or come from animals who were fed on corn.
  • How much does a pirate pay for corn? Why, a buccaneer of course!

Hope you all enjoy your veggies this week!

Linda and all of  your Winter Green Farmers

 

 

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #12

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Those who have no time for healthy eating will sooner or later have to find time for illness.”  Edward Stanley

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS;

Important Site Changes for our Madison St. Members in Eugene!! 

Remember that your site is changing this week due to the old site host moving. Your new location is at 1852 Washington St. The CSA Shares will be on the porch, on the right hand side. Your new site host is Amanda Dublin…if you see her there, please introduce  yourself and welcome her to the farm family!

That’s My Farmer Benefit Dinner

Reservations are filling up quickly for this amazing dinner and fundraiser….if you have never been before, you are missing out! Party Downtown creates a top shelf menu with food donated by the participating farms and the results are fantastic! it’s a family style setting where we all have a fun time, while raising money for the Low Income Fund, to help those in need be able to eat healthy food. Come join us!

The dinner will be held on Monday, September 30th at 6pm at Party Downtown in Eugene. The tickets are $50 per person, and $30 of that will go into the Low Income Fund.

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Lettuce ~ Romaine
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Cilantro
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Red Onion
  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Eggplant

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Cherry Tomatoes

RECIPES:

Parmesan Zucchini Bites

Tomato, Zucchini & Corn Pie w/Almond Crust

Carrot Top Pesto Quinoa Salad w/Roasted Carrots

Grilled Ratatouille Pasta Salad

Crispy Eggplant Fritters w/Smoked Mozzarella

Watermelon Cups

This is the last week of August and I can feel the change in the air. Yes, it’s still getting warm during the daytime, but the light is changing, with darkness coming earlier and earlier, and the temps at night are cooling. I wouldn’t exactly call it Fall yet, but I can feel it coming…

I took a walk around the farm today, first time in a while. I wanted to check out the corn to see if it’s close to being harvested. It’s sizing up slowly this year, we think due to the cool temps at night, and we’re all trying to be patient (I mean, what else can we do!!) but it’s hard….we all want to taste that sweet, juicy goodness we wait all year for!

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I enjoyed walking through the fields of late season crops and was inspired by the the winter squash as it sizes up and begins to color…won’t be long before we’ll all be enjoying the sweet taste of roasted squash and hearty soups. But for now it’s pepper heaven, eggplant ecstasy, and zucchini madness!

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Chris and Shannon have been hosting Chris’s parents this week, in their new home! Joe and Deb Overbaugh traveled from Pennsylvania to visit their family, and see all of the changes on the farm since Chris and Shannon took over. Although retired now, Deb

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worked for many years with the Head Start program, and Joe was the chief financial officer for a large company, while also raising two sets of twins!  Deb enjoyed helping to pack your boxes while she was here!

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We hope you will enjoy your veggies this week!

Linda and all of your Winter Green Farmers

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #11

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“It’s difficult to think anything but pleasant thoughts while eating a homegrown tomato.” -Lewis Grizzard

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

It’s the season when we offer our grass fed Beef and Lamb. If you have purchased in previous years, you will most likely be receiving information soon. If not, then please get in touch to reserve your share for this year.

Beef Shares: We offer organic grass fed mixed cut shares in 1/4, 1/2 and whole shares. The cost is $4.95/lb for the 1/4 share, and reduces by $.10/lb for the 1/2 and  $.20/lb for a whole animal. This price includes cutting, wrapping and freezing. Delivery to Portland and the Coast is available with a small fee. We will offer non-organic mixed cuts and hamburger shares for less per lb. We’ll be putting the current info up on the website shortly.

Lamb Shares: We offer organic grass fed lamb shares at $6.00/lb with additional cut and wrap fees, which you will pay directly to 4 Star Meats.

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Lettuce
  • Carrots
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Tomatoes
  • Red Onion
  • Walla Walla Onion
  • Green Beans

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Eggplant

RECIPES:

Melitzanosalata (Greek Eggplant Dip)

Sautéed Zucchini & Cherry Tomatoes

Blistered Green Beans w/Garlic

Spinach w/Balsamic Caramelized Red Onions

Chilled Red Pepper & Carrot Soup w/Yogurt

Long term members the Frishkoff’s  hosted their son’s wedding recently at Mt. Pisqah. They really enjoyed this signature dish, and wanted to share it with us all. It was originally made by Executive Chef at Market Catering, and replicited by Pat Frishkoff, using CSA ingredients!

MALLORCAN TUMBET
Cut all thinly. I do by hand; a mandolin would be more uniform. Cut on the bias as much as possible.

Pre-cook (I used microwave) until stuff but not raw
  • 6 medium new potatoes skin on
  • 1/2 large sweet onion
  • 1 pepper, bell, any color
  • I large zucchini
  • 1 large eggplant ( for this only, I squeezed one fresh lemon, and drizzled 1 tbsp of olive oil, so it would not go brown), if the eggplant slices are significantly larger than the potatoes, cut them in 1/2, 1/3, or 1/4. Make the slices similar in circle size as possible. For aesthetics, not cooking.
Baste very lightly with slightly spicy/sweet marinara. I made homemade, but canned would work. If homemade, boil the tomatoes and peel. Cool. Crush with hands.
Seasoning that I used:
  • 2 crushed garlic cloves
  • 1/3 cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 tsp lemon pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp Mrs Dash
  • 2 tsp Italian seasoning (or fresh basil)
Simmer until not running. Sauce consistency.use basting brush to apply.
This should makes 9 by 12 pan. If veggies are left, make another smaller pan, or toss-in a pot and make soup.
I have another recipe for you from long term member Lisa Plumb…she says this is one of her favorites and she makes it every year! Enjoy….
Pasta with Easy Summer Sauce
  • 2 cups quartered grape or cherry tomatoes*
  •  ¼ cup minced fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh basil
  • ½ cup minced red onions
  • 1 garlic clove, minced or pressed
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar (optional)**
  • 1 pound farfalle or other short chunky pasta
  • 2 cups cut green beans (2-inch pieces)
  • ½ cup crumbled feta cheese, or more to taste

Bring a large covered pot of salted water to a boil.  Meanwhile, combine the tomatoes, parsley, basil, red onions, garlic, olives, oil, salt, pepper, and vinegar, if using, in a large bowl.

When the water boils, stir in the pasta, cover, and cook for 2 to 3 minutes.  When the water returns to a boil, add the green beans and cook for 8 to 10 minutes, until the pasta is al dente and the beans are tender.  Drain well.

Add the pasta and green beans to the bowl with the seasoned tomatoes.  Stir in the feta cheese and gently toss everything together.  Serve hot or at room temperature.

*Or any variety of tomato diced into ½-inch pieces

**Taste the tomato mixture to decide if your tomatoes “want” the additional vinegar

Serves 4 to 6

We’re in the final days of summer vacation and I imagine that many of you are planning last getaways, backyard BBQ’s, school shopping….hope that whatever you have planned for the last days of “freedom” (or for some of you, looking forward to some “freedom”) brings you happiness and enjoyment. Glad our veggies can be a part of it all!

Linda and all of your Winter Green Farmers

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #10

“An organic farmer is the best peacemaker today, because there is more violence, more death, more destruction, more wars, through a violent industrial agricultural system. And to shift away from that into an agriculture of peace is what organic farming is doing.”                                                                                                                               Vandana Shiva

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

This community event has lots to share….hope you can make it there!

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WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Lettuce ~ Romaine or Red Leaf
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumber
  • Potatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Tomatoes
  • Strawberries

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Broccoli
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Green Beans

RECIPES:

Roasted Beet & Goat Cheese Soup

Rainbow Hummus Bowls

Beet & Sweet Potato Fries

Healthy Baked Zucchini Tots

Zucchini Tomato Bake

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Carrots right out of the field….we’re still enjoying carrots with tops! They’ll be hosed off individually and then sent through the spray washer.

IMG_3407One of our crew, Steve today, will receive them on the other end, make sure they’re clean enough and put them in bins. Carrots freshly washed and ready to send out to you…..Maggie knows how to make the job fun!

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This being the 10th week of CSA puts us right in the middle of the Standard Season and in the Dog Days of Summer. The ancient Romans called the hottest, most humid days of summer “diēs caniculārēs” or “dog days.” The name came about because they associated the hottest days of summer with the star Sirius. Sirius was known as the “Dog Star” because it was the brightest star in the constellation Canis Major (Large Dog). Sirius also happens to be the brightest star in the night sky.

Sirius is so bright that the ancient Romans thought it radiated extra heat toward Earth. During the summer when Sirius rises and sets with the Sun, they thought Sirius added heat to the Sun’s heat to cause hotter summer temperatures.

For the ancient Romans, the dog days of summer occurred from about July 24 to around August 24. Over time, though, the constellations have drifted somewhat. 

Although the dog days of summer are usually the hottest, they don’t have anything to do with either dogs or the star Sirius. Instead, the tilt of the Earth explains why these days tend to be the summer’s hottest. During summer in the Northern Hemisphere, the tilt of the Earth causes Sun’s light to hit the Northern Hemisphere at a more direct angle, and for a longer period of time throughout the day. This means longer, hotter days during the summer.

FARMER PROFILE:

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This week we would love feature Erin Katovich as our farmer! Erin is new to the farm this season, although she has lived locally most of her life. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a degree in Environmental Science, Ethics and Food Studies. She is very interested in food production systems, such as biodynamics, that improve the land and lives of both growers and eaters.

Erin is a great addition to our crew. She has seemingly boundless enthusiasm and takes on any task thrown her way. She has a great attitude, a quirky sense of humor, and entertains the crew with her stories and jokes. Erin raises chickens, turkeys & quail, as well as many exotic insect species, such as pet mantids & composition cockroaches. She loves to introduce people to new and exciting types of arthropods (an invertebrate animal of the large phylum Arthropoda, such as an insect, spider, or crustacean). If you came to our Open House back in June, you had the opportunity to meet Erin and her collection of friends and family.

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Erin participated in 4H as a child, doing projects with chickens, rabbits, horses, steer, cow-calf, pottery, theatre, sewing, dogs and cats. She has broad knowledge and if she doesn’t now something, she finds out! She also loves o garden, and enjoys focusing on rare edibles and carnivorous plants. She also bakes the crew goodies! If you would like to see some of the insects and plants that Erin raises, and sells, you can visit her Instagram page @quailinthecity.

We hope you all enjoy your box this week….it’s a full one!!

❤️ Linda and all of your Winter Green Farmers

 

 

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #9

“The ultimate goal of farming is not the growing of crops, but the cultivation and perfection of human beings.”

Masanobu Fukuoka

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

Salsa Box! This week we will give the ingredients to make some salsa! We always like to let  you know, as there will be jalapeño peppers in the box….we want to make sure that any little fingers reaching in for those strawberries don’t accidentally grab the jalapeño and get a big surprise!

 

Strawberries! We will continue to prioritize CSA members receiving their promised amount of berries, but will send along flats to members when we can. Reserve your flat and if you have a definite date you need them by, we will do our best to accommodate you.

Beef! Thank  you to all who got a beef delivery last week. Part of our biodynamic philosophy is having animals be a holistic component to our farms’ fertility. We will have another cow harvest in October, so if you are thinking of partaking, start cleaning out your freezer! Pasture raised meat is full of vitamins and minerals, and can set you up for eating locally all year long!

That’s My Farmer Benefit Dinner! It’s almost time for the 4th Annual dinner at Party Downtown. Owner/chefs Mark Kosmicki and Tiffany Norton will cook up a fantastic menu with farm fresh meat and produce contributed by the farmers. This year the dinner will be on September 30th at 6pm. Tickets will be $50 per dinner….$30 of that goes into the That’s My Farmer Low Income Fund to subsidize CSA Shares for those unable to afford them. Reserve your seat by sending a check to Winter Green Farm (made out to That’s My Farmer) at 89762 Poodle Creek Rd., Noti, OR 97461.

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Carrots
  • Lettuce ~ Red Oak Leaf or Frilly Romaine
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Cilantro
  • Tomatoes
  • Jalapeños
  • Strawberries
  • Green Onions

SOMES SITES ONLY

  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Green Beans

RECIPES:

Tomato Harissa Coconut Bisque

Tomato Fennel & White Bean Stew

Zucchini Bread with Cherries, Chocolate & Cardamom

Jammy Strawberry Galette

With the heat still cranking’ out this week all of our veggies are in full flush. It won’t be long before we’re enjoying all the summer goodness. For now, we hope you keep enjoying the beginning of tomato season.
INGREDIENTS
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 yellow onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, minced or grated
  • 2 tablespoon fresh thyme leaves, plus more for serving
  • 1 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup shredded Havarti cheese
  • 1 sheet frozen puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1/4 cup fresh basil, chopped
  • 1 pinch crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • everything bagel spice, for sprinkling
  • fresh chopped chives

Steps:

Preheat the oven to 425° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil shimmers, add the onions and honey and cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally until softened. Season with salt and pepper and continue cooking another 5-10 minutes or until the onions are golden and caramelized. Add the garlic, and thyme, cook another minute. Remove from the heat.

3. In a bowl, combine the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil, the tomatoes, balsamic vinegar, basil, crushed red pepper, and a pinch each of salt and pepper.

4. Lay the pastry sheet flat on a clean, floured surface. Gently roll the sheets out to stretch slightly. Cut each sheet into 4 squares and place onto the prepared baking sheet. Evenly top each square with onions, leaving a 1/4 inch border. Top with both kinds of cheese and then mound the tomatoes over the cheese, pressing them into the cheese to adhere slightly (see above photo).

5. Fold the edges of the pastry inward to enclose the tomatoes. Brush the edges of the pastry with beaten egg and sprinkle with everything spice. Transfer to the oven and bake for 20-25 minutes or until the pastry is golden and the tomatoes burst. Top with fresh thyme and chives.

Cauliflower Fritters ~ sent in by member Beth Lemen, given to her son by his teacher from an after school SUN program, run by Latino Network. They love it!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 head cauliflower
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 1/2 cup bread crumbs
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 eggs
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 1/4 cup canola oil

STEPS:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°
  2. Cut the cauliflower into florets and peel the garlic, leaving git whole, and place in a mixing bowl. Toss in 2 Tbsp oil, salt, and pepper. Transfer to a baking sheet and roast for 20 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine Parmesan cheese, bread crumbs, flour, and eggs in the same mixing bowl you used before. Set aside.
  4. When the cauliflower and garlic are done cooking, transfer them to a food processor and roughly chop using pulses. Combine the cauliflower/garlic mixture with the other ingredients in the mixing bowl. You want the mixture to be somewhat wet, but if the mixture is very wet, slowly add more flour.
  5. Preheat a sauce pan with canola oil on medium high heat. Add golf ball sized dollops of the cauliflower mixture and press flat with a spatula. When sides are golden brown, flip the fritters and cook on the other side.
  6. Serve on paper towels to absorb the extra oil.

Patty Pan squash and green zucchini

Farmer Spotlight:

Meet one of our newest additions to Winter Green Farm, Ayla. Ayla is one of our youngest crew members this season, at just 18 she makes a great addition to our team! Ayla graduated high school and traveled north with dreams of farming in beautiful Oregon. Originally from Santa Cruz, California, we are thrilled to be a stop of Ayla’s post graduation journey. Ayla works on our field crew all week, harvesting many of the delicious veggies you get in your boxes and at our markets. Ayla is enjoying country living at its’ finest this season, since she’s camping out on the farm for the entire summer. We appreciate her positive attitude and hard working demeanor everyday. When she isn’t working hard in the fields, she enjoys art projects and learning new recipes. We can’t wait to see what she does next!

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My hope is that through introducing small pieces of our crew through the blog we will all feel a little more connected to who’s growing our food. It’s nice to be able to picture the folks that are working so hard to grow beautiful produce. And this way if you ever see them around town, you can say hi! I hope you enjoy these little highlights of our crew this year, we are so lucky at Winter Green to have so many great helping hands- a farm this size sure takes a village!

Enjoy your veggies this week! -Hayley and the Winter Green Farmers

2019 CSA Share ~ Week #8

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SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS:

We’re taking orders for Strawberry Flats and will continue to send them out as we have enough….we’re in a major flush right  now that should last another week or so…..then they will slow down, but continue to produce.

Welcome to August…..if you have set up a recurring payment with us using your credit or debit card, please do get in touch if any of  your info has changed due to lost cards, new expiration dates, or if your address has changed due to a move. All of these can result in a declined transaction….we appreciate your help with these updates.

WHAT’S IN YOUR SHARE THIS WEEK:

  • Lettuce ~ Frilly Romaine
  • Beets
  • Zucchini
  • Cucumbers
  • Collards
  • Tomatoes
  • Walla Walla Onion
  • Strawberries
  • Blueberries

SOME SITES ONLY

  • Cauliflower
  • Cherry Tomatoes

RECIPES:

Roasted Beets & Sautéed Beet Greens

Papa’s Favorite Beet Salad

Sweet Walla Walla Onion Rings w/Basil Buttermilk Dip

Walls Walla Sweet Onion~Swiss Cheese Casserole

Stuffed Zucchini Boats

Lemon Blueberry Biscuits

Strawberry Blueberry Almond Crisp

Mama Barn Swallow sharing breakfast with her brood…won’t be long before they’ll be flying around testing out their wings!

How can it be the end of July already!! I think I must wonder that every summer….the one thing about farming life is that you really are always a couple weeks ahead of the actual date. You’re planning ahead for what will be seeded in the greenhouse, planning ahead for which crops need to be transplanted, which crops need to be harvested, or tilled in. We’re planning ahead to see what will be in the CSA boxes a week or two down the road….we seem to always be a little ahead of our actual life! We do have times of being in the moment, and we relish those times for sure. The mornings when the new day is unfolding, and the birds are out and about getting those proverbial “early worms”. The sun rising above the hill, shining on the evergreens, giving them that golden glow. And of course, harvesting before the morning dew has had a chance to burn off.

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This first week of August has been celebrated by many cultures since ancient times. Lammas is typically celebrated on August 1st or 2nd (also called Lughnasadh), when the hot days of August are upon us. It’s time to reap what we have sown, gathering up the first harvests of grain, wheat, oats and more. In our modern world, it’s often easy to forget the trials and tribulations our ancestors had to endure. For us, if we need a loaf of bread, we simply drive over to the local grocery and buy some, or at least the flour, salt etc. to bake our own. If we run out, it’s not a big deal. Our ancestors didn’t have it so easy. If crops were left in the fields too long, or the bread not baked in time, families could starve. Taking care of one’s crops meant the difference between life and death. By recognizing Lammas, we honor our ancestors, and the hard work they had to do to survive. This is a good time to give thanks for the abundance we have in our lives, and to be grateful for the food on our tables!

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The heat of the last few weeks has encouraged our veggies to grow, grow, grow…while we may not give  these huge beets to our members, the crew sure appreciates taking them home. Erin has been salvaging giant zucchini and then bringing muffins in for the crew. Thanks Erin for the yummy break treats!

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We are giving out the giant onions though….these should make some awesome onion rings….I included a recipe if  you feel  inspired! I know I’ll be making some this week!

We all hope you have a great week and of course, enjoy your veggies!

Linda and all of your Winter Green Farmers